Some Liberty University grads are returning their diplomas to protest Trump

Some Liberty University grads are returning their diplomas to protest Trump

"But he does not have a racist bone in his body".

Traditionally, a White House would have officials on the agenda-setting Sunday shows to help set the narrative for the coming week, particularly after such a disastrous week like the one Trump had.

'I think the president has made it very clear that there is no moral equivalency between what the counter-protesters did, even though maybe some of them resorted to violence in response. and somebody driving his auto into a crowd because he hates people of other races, ' Falwell said.

Chris Gaumer, a former Student Government Association president and 2006 graduate, said it was a simple decision.

Still, Falwell, who backed Trump before the 2016 Iowa Caucus, traditionally the first in the county, acknowledged that after talking to Jewish and African American colleagues and friends, he believed Trump perhaps could have chosen his words more carefully.

Falwell, president of Liberty University, said Trump represents something the USA has not had in national leadership "in a long time".

"He saw videos of who was there. I don't know. But he had information I didn't have".

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It doesn't seem Falwell is too concerned about the angry alumni though and he went on ABC's This Weekto double down on his support for Trump, going as far as to say that the reason why Trump could say there were "fine people" on both sides in Charlottesville was because as commander in chief he "has inside information".

"The bold and truthful statements I was referring to were his willingness to call evil and terrorism by its name, to identify the groups, the Nazis, the KKK, the white supremacists", Falwell said. In recent days, multiple members of Trump's evangelical advisory board have publicly condemned white supremacy, though most have stopped short of criticizing the president by name.

"I don't have that information", he said. And I admire him for that'.

"There's no good KKK", he also said.

"I don't know that to be the fact", Falwell admitted.

He also noted that as part of his commentary on the Charlottesville violence, Trump had labeled as "evil" white supremacists, neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members.

Raddatz asked Falwell if he'd like to see Trump be more careful with his words. The letter on the group's Facebook page says Falwell, son of the university's founder, has failed to condemn "things which are patently against the religion he and LU claim".

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