Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Special counsel Robert Mueller has subpoenaed President Donald Trump financial dealings with Deutsche Bank, likely including information on a large loan borrowed from Germany's biggest financial institution, according to reports.

"No subpoena has been issued or received", White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a briefing.

A day later, the DOJ announced that former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents during the investigation about his contacts with three individuals said to have had connections to the Russian government.

A release from the Special Counsel's Office says that new expenditure reports will be released every six months, with the next one coming on March 30, 2018.

Trump's relationship with Deutsche Bank stretches back some two decades and the roughly $300 million he owes to the bank represents almost half of his outstanding debt, according to a July 2016 analysis compiled by Bloomberg news agency.

Mr Mueller is investigating claims of collusion between Trump's aides and Russian officials while also probing Moscow's influence in the U.S. presidential election which brought Trump, the billionaire businessman into power.

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Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Then not long after that, Trump attorney Jay Sekulow confirmed to Reuters that there was no Trump finances subpoena sent to Deutsche Bank. A string of bankruptcies at his hotel and casino businesses during the 1990s made most of Wall Street wary of extending him credit.

Deutsche Bank agreed in January to pay $630m in fines for organising $10bn in sham trades that could have been used to launder Russian money.

That figure includes a $170-million loan Trump took out to finish a hotel in Washington.

US Democrats have argued federal laws protecting customer confidentiality do not apply to requests from US Congress.

In January, Deutsche Bank agreed to pay $630 million in fines for organizing $10 billion in sham trades that could have been used to launder money out of Russian Federation.

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